resourcesnshit

  1. pipluppp asked: What do you use for your line art? >.<

    wannabeanimator:

    jinn-y:

    I actually just use the #2 Hard Round brush in Photoshop. However, it’s easier to get cleaner-looking lines since I use the Wacom Cintiqs on my school campus.

    image



    My tip is to draw the lines really quickly and clean them up after, because the faster you put the line down the less squiggly they’re going to be. I have a lot of trouble with my hand shaking when I draw, so that’s been extremely useful for me, especially when I’m using my tablet. It’ll look like a mess at first because there’ll be lines overlapping each other all over the place, but the lines will look really nice once you erase the excess!

    image

    I hope that helps. :D

    A quick tip that has helped me fight off the shaky lines you often get when trying to make line art in Photoshop.

  2. pascalcampion:

More awesome tips from Grizandnorm.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture DrawingAs a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.Norm

    pascalcampion:

    More awesome tips from Grizandnorm.

    grizandnorm:

    Tuesday Tips - Gesture Drawing

    As a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing 
    gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.

    I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.

    I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.

    For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.

    Norm

  3. ktshy:

    helpfulharrie:

    !! Woah guys! Pixelovely’s new tools are finally out, one for hands & feet, and one for faces!

    There’s now 429 photos of hands & feet, and 314 photos of faces. Dang!!

    This is super cool news and I certainly can’t wait to start using them haha

    I’ve got tons of tutorials on hands, feet and faces in their relevant tags, so be sure to check those out too nwn

    Check out Pixelovely! I usually start my drawing day by warming up with the figure drawing practice sessions.

    (via wannabeanimator)

  4. superkarissa64:

    slimmerboo:

    marcelinedrawsooo:

    I stumbled upon a website that allows you to blend any colors evenly no matter how opposite on the spectrum they are.

    sharing the knowledge

    image

    very helpful art resource

    WHERE HAS THIS BEEN ALL MY LIFE???

    (Source: sketchcomplex, via wannabeanimator)

  5. grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”Norm

    grizandnorm:

    Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.

    A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)

    Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?

    I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.

    Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”

    Norm

    (via krupadeluxe)

  6. xfreischutz:

    I was going to review my french and linguistics but then this happened instead.
    Except it’s 3.30am so it’s half-assed. //shotdead

    But hopefully people will find this of use. \o/ Sorry this took so long, Anon, and I hope it answers your questions.

    (via wannabeanimator)

  7. wannabeanimator:

Character design tips by Wouter Tulp via Character Design References
  8. wannabeanimator:

    CalArts Lecture via Robertryan Cory

  9. beouija:

    The super-duper Dan Berry asked me what getting an idea feels like for me & I spent a long time thinking about it.

    NINE THINGS GETTING AN IDEA FEELS LIKE (to me)

    1)  Groping around in a dark room and feeling something that’s a weird shape and just touching it everywhere and trying to figure out what it is. Then you try to draw a picture of the shape, whatever it is, in the dark. It comes out all wrong, but you kind of like it anyway.


    2)  Being in a really messy room filled with piles of broken shit and then finding a small but powerful magic electromagnet and turning it on. All the broken shit  sort of hovers up into the air & the pieces sort of go whoom-whoom-whoom & stick to the elecromagnet until they make an object & the room is clean (I think I’ve seen an anime where this happens).

    3)  You are in a dark cave. There’s a deep hole that opens out into a dark underground sea filled with stuff. You are fishing creatures and things up through the hole with a really thin piece of string. Sometimes you get pretty scared you’re going to fall into the hole

    4)  Your mind is a stinky room filled with hundreds of feral cats and cat shit. Sometimes you open a window in your mind & it’s light & clean & there are interesting things & people outside the window. Why don’t you always keep the windows open? Who let all these cats in? Why don’t you get out of there once in a while?

    5)  There is low-level screaming in your mind at all times. Sometimes the screaming gets so loud inside your mind that you start screaming in real life also. You could go to a therapist, or you could draw a comic about it. Therapists are very expensive.

    6)  There are irritating flies in your mind that are always biting you. You shoo them away & try to kill them. They just fly around and lay eggs and die and eat the shit in your mind like flies do. But then every so often you look closely at one of the flies. It’s actually a beautiful fairy princess with diamond-rainbow wings! She wants you to draw her picture! Wow!

    7)  You are sick and need to vomit & so you do & then you feel better. Then you let people look at the vomit. They like it! They think you’re so cool because of your vomit! They want to make out with you!

    8)  You’re just hanging out in your mind & then you find something in there very small, very tiny, but when you look at it closely it’s the shield of Achilles in that scene in The Iliad with the earth & sun & sky & cities & weddings & fields being plowed & wars being fought & grape pickers & a bull being attacked by lions & sheep & men & women dancing & the ocean.

    9)  There is a funny story you tell at parties & then one day you realize that if you just tweak a couple things and change everyones’ name it would make a decent comic. Bang! Done.